Volume 88, Issue 9 p. 1409-1416
Original Paper

Antioxidant and Prooxidant Activity Behavior of Phospholipids in Stripped Soybean Oil-in-Water Emulsions

Vladimiro Cardenia

Vladimiro Cardenia

Dipartimento di Scienze degli Alimenti, Alma Mater Studiorum-Università di Bologna, Viale G. Fanin 40, Bologna, 40127 Italy

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Thaddao Waraho

Thaddao Waraho

Department of Food Science, University of Massachusetts-Amherst, 236 Chenoweth Laboratory, Amherst, MA, 01003 USA

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Maria Teresa Rodriguez-Estrada

Maria Teresa Rodriguez-Estrada

Dipartimento di Scienze degli Alimenti, Alma Mater Studiorum-Università di Bologna, Viale G. Fanin 40, Bologna, 40127 Italy

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D. Julian McClements

D. Julian McClements

Department of Food Science, University of Massachusetts-Amherst, 236 Chenoweth Laboratory, Amherst, MA, 01003 USA

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Eric A. Decker

Corresponding Author

Eric A. Decker

Department of Food Science, University of Massachusetts-Amherst, 236 Chenoweth Laboratory, Amherst, MA, 01003 USA

[email protected]Search for more papers by this author
First published: 31 March 2011
Citations: 53

Abstract

Phospholipids have been reported to inhibit lipid oxidation in bulk oils, but very little is known about their influence on oxidation in oil-in-water emulsions. In the present study, the impact of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) on lipid oxidation was studied in 1% stripped soybean oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions as a function of DOPC concentration and pH (3 and 7). At pH 7.0, DOPC inhibited lipid oxidation in O/W emulsions, while DOPC was prooxidative at pH 3.0. DOPC did not affect emulsion droplet charge or size at either pH 3.0 or 7.0. The antioxidant activity at pH 7.0 was observed in a series of phospholipids (PL) that varied in fatty acid unsaturation level and chain length as well as type of phosphate head group. Overall, phosphatidylcholine with either oleic or palmitic acid were the most effective at inhibiting lipid hydroperoxide and hexanal formation of all of the PL tested. Antioxidant mechanism of PL could not be ascribed to their ability to decompose lipid hydroperoxides. It might be possible that, at pH 7.0, the PL antioxidant activity is related to their ability to form structures within the lipid phase of the emulsions droplets or to chelate metals.