Volume 17, Issue 12 p. 924-934
Article

Effects of cereals and culture filtrate ofTrichoderma viride on lipid metabolism of swine

Asaf A. Qureshi

Asaf A. Qureshi

SEA-AR, Barley and Malt Laboratory, USDA, 501 N. Walnut Street, Madison, WI, 53705

Department of Agronomy, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, 53706

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Warren C. Burger

Warren C. Burger

SEA-AR, Barley and Malt Laboratory, USDA, 501 N. Walnut Street, Madison, WI, 53705

Department of Agronomy, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, 53706

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Charles E. Elson

Charles E. Elson

Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, 53706

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Norlin J. Benevenga

Norlin J. Benevenga

Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, 53706

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First published: 01 December 1982
Citations: 26

Cooperative investigation between the Science and Education Administration, US Department of Agriculture, and College of Agricultural and Life Sciences, University of Wisconsin, Madison.

Mention of a trademark or proprietary product does not constitute a guarantee or warranty of the product by the US Department of Agriculture and does not imply its approval to the exclusion of other products that may also be suitable.

Abstract

Swine were fed corn-or barley-based diets with, or without, culture filtrate (CF) ofTrichoderma viride for 21 days. Weight gains were nonsignificantly but slightly increased by CF. The activities of β-hydroxy-β-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase, acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACX), fatty acid synthetase (FAS) and other lipogenic enzymes in several tissues were determined. Significant decreases in the activities of HMG-CoA reductase and cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase in all tissues of swine fed the CF-diets were observed. The major site for the regulation of cholesterol biosynthesis was adipose tissue followed by the intestine, liver, lung and muscle in order of activity The concentrations of cholesterol in serum and muscle were decreased 27% and 23%, respectively, by CF. ACX and FAS activities increased ca. 2-fold when CF was fed with either of the cereal-based diets. The major sites for fatty acid synthesis was the adipose tissue and, to a lesser extent, the liver. Very low rates of synthesis were detected in intestine, lung and muscle. Similar distributions of activities were found for related lipogenic enzymes.